FAO Beginners: Don’t Buy a Snooker Cue Until You’ve Read This…

Are you thinking of buying a new snooker cue? If so, then here are 15 simple points to think about when choosing to buy one…

  1. Cost – how much are you willing to pay for your cue?
  2. Weight – how heavy do you want the cue?
  3. Ferrule size – How long and wide do you want the ferrule to fit on the cue?
  4. Type of snooker cue – Do you want a 1 piece cue, or a 2 piece either in 1/2 joint, or 3/4 joint?
  5. Materials: Wood – Ash or Maple? Ebony or Rosewood for the butt
  6. Cue Design patterns – Do you just want a basic pattern? Or something more ornate? Remember, the more expensive the cue is, is nothing to do with quality but the amount of work involved in the design…
  7. Splicing – For cheaper cues, the craft will be machine spliced whereas as more expensive cues are handcrafted.
  8. Cleaning and looking after your cue: You need to remember that a cue is a piece of wood and needs tender loving care. Keep it well oiled and regularly wiped down with either a towel or wet wipes to get rid of dirt and grime and chalk AFTER EVERY SESSION…
  9. Don’t buy a cue unless you’re able to try one out first either in a shop or at your/ a club
  10. Remember: Buying a brand new super-duper cue will not make you a better player, but having a regular good COACH WILL!
  11. Protecting your cue: Get a good solid case – preferably with locks – especially if you are travelling to events on the amateur/professional scene…
  12. Don’t leave your cue in extreme temperatures either hot or cold. The wood will WARP.
  13. Don’t lean a cue against a wall for too long otherwise over time it will bend
  14. You’ll need to oil your cue occasionally so the wood doesn’t dry out. You can use linseed oil –
  15. WARNING: rolling a cue on the bed of a table is NOT the way to check if the cue is straight or not. Simply pick the cue up and position it as if you were shooting a rifle, look down the line of the cue using one eye and that will tell you if it’s straight or not!

Now, let’s go through some of these points in a little more detail…

BUYING CUES: COST 

A snooker cue can actually be an expensive piece of equipment. As human beings, we revel in buying the most super-duper gadgets and toys and for some, a cue will be a bit like buying a fancy new car! It’s a status thing. Look at me! I’ve got a John Parris cue! However, there are lots of different cues that cost just under £100 and are perfectly playable. Just ask yourself this KEY question when you’re buying one: Am I buying to keep up with the latest trend, or are you buying it because you REALLY like the feel of the cue? Imagine spending £500 for a cue.

[bctt tweet=”rolling a cue on the bed of a table is NOT the way to check if the cue is straight or not. Simply pick the cue up and position it as if you were shooting a rifle, look down the line of the cue using one eye and that will tell you if it’s straight or not!” username=”@chrisgaynor2″]

Imagine this for a second…

You could have 8 two hour lessons with a coach at £60 for that. What would you rather have? 8 hours worth of improvement, or a £500 cue that looks good, but still doesn’t improve your game? It’s your decision…

WEIGHT OF CUES

Generally, a cue will weigh between 17/18 ounces, and the length will be around 57 inches. However, depending on your height, you may want to get a cue maker to alter the length of the cue. Also, sometimes, when you put on a new ferrule, you may well need to have some cue chopped. For example, when SnookerZone had a new Titanium ferrule fitted to his Cue Craft Cue, our cue had to be chopped from 57 inches to 56…Obviously, when a cue gets shorter or longer, it alters the position of where you will play the shot in butt grip and bridge hand position! In terms of weight, it really is a personal thing and you should try out a few cues of different weights to gauge what feels right for you!

[bctt tweet=”Imagine this…You could have 8 two hour lessons with a coach at £60 for that. What would you rather have? 8 hours worth of improvement, or a £500 cue that still doesn’t improve your game? It’s your call…” username=”@chrisgaynor2″]

FERRULE ON A SNOOKER CUE

There are ferrules of many different shapes and sizes. As we said in point 2, sometimes the size of a ferrule will mean a cue needs to be shortened. Again, if you’re serious about buying a cue, consult a cue maker first and find out a little bit about the types of cue before buying one blind!

TYPE OF CUES

Are you going to be travelling a lot? Then you may want to consider buying a 2 piece cue – FOR CONVENIENCE and EASE of travelling around. This means you will need a case to carry it around and one that is solid and strong – preferably with locks. SnookerZone recommends CUE CRAFT who do some great Aluminium cases that have locks so you can rest assured your cue won’t get stolen or won’t get damaged! Find yours HERE!

CLEANING YOUR CUE…

There are two simple ways you can clean your snooker cue: They are:

TYPE OF WOOD FOR CUES: ASH OR MAPLE?

Most cues are made of either Ash or Maple. They both have a different feel, but it again is a personal preference. SnookerZone’s Cue Craft cue is Ash and is quite thick in the density of the wood. Ash is a durable strong wood generally and feels smooth to touch. The Ash is light in colour and there is a grain you can see down the cue…

Maple wood for cues generally do not have a grain and can be either white or an off creamy white in colour – sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. It’s not as durable as Ash and is prone to rotting to an insect attack!

It’s really up to you which type of wood you decide to go for, but Ash is the most popular because of its durability.

SNOOKER CUE DESIGN PATTERNS

This is related to the cost of the cue you decide to buy. The more ornate the design and patterns of the cue, the more expensive the cue will be because of the labour intensiveness of having to create the patterns and to get the design right. Lots of cue makers now create expensive and ornate patterns for the cue collector with lots of cash at their disposal. But, SnookerZone says it again…

SNOOKER CUE TIPS

A tip is the most important part of a snooker cue…

SnookerZone says the most important part of a snooker cue, is the tip. This is simply because the cue ball is struck with a tip, NOT the whole cue. So, more importantly, it’s imperative you have a good solid tip on your cue. SnookerZone has reviewed many tips in the Equipment Zone of SnookerZone.

 

[bctt tweet=”BUYING 8 Hours worth of Coaching Lessons has got to be greater value than £500 for a snooker cue? …” username=”@chrisgaynor2″]

 

 

 

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